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ELTAC

Enhancing Lectures through Automated Capture (ELTAC) Assembly

University of Coventry (18-03-2010)

Aims of the Assembly

· To explore the question of what staff development needs arise when a new capture technology is being introduced into an institution

· To produce relevant collective resources for use by the wider HE community based on common and divergent experiences in implementing capture technologies for learning and teaching

· To pool expertise and surface/identify related issues

Participants

The Assembly was attended by:

Paul Bailey (JISC)
Phil Bradley (Newcastle University)
John Couperthwaite (University of Birmingham)
John Davies (University of Sussex)
Amanda Hardy (Coventry University)
Juliet Hinrichsen (Coventry University)
Jenny Mackness (JISC)
Gameel Nasser (University of Birmingham)
Kris Roger (London School of Economics and Political Science)
Charles Shields (Loughborough University)
Carol Summerside (Newcastle University)

Findings from the ELTAC project

David Morris welcomed participants and briefly outlined the key findings from the ELTAC project

  1. The ‘automated’ bit of lecture capture is difficult. Colleagues won’t necessarily take it on board.
  2. The meaning of ‘lecture’ is very broad.
  3. The conception of what is ‘captured’ has changed for the ELTAC team.
  4. The licence costs of proprietary lecture capture software can be a barrier to scalability
  5. There are organisational barriers – many ‘bits’ of the University needs to be involved to install the technology into lecture theatres, but liaison between them can be difficult.
  6. Lecture capture is less about embedding, automating and technology and more about how lecture capture should be used in the broader framework of teaching and whether it makes a significant difference to teaching and learning.

Programme for the day

The Assembly was planned as a workshop-style day focussing on purposeful community building and the production of a scoping document, management briefing and scenarios to draw out key teaching and learning, infrastructure and managerial issues for use in staff development. The outputs from the day will be attributed to authors and their institutions and also be available for wider dissemination across the HE sector.

Lecture Capture – key issues

The outputs from the day were informed by initial discussion and sharing of context and issues at individual institutions, which in turn informed the production of a scoping document, management briefing and scenarios. These issues included the following:

· Practical issues

Technical: Such as server problems when scaling up, bugs in the system, people unplugging wires

Room bookings: Some institutions match rooms to student numbers, which makes lecture capture impossible for some groups; Room booking needs to be automated to reduce administration time; Bookings need to be scheduled

Audio: Quality issues; Use of microphones in small venues; Ensuring microphones are switched on

Video: Is it always needed?

Support: How will this be provided?

· Pedagogical issues

Some lecturers feel that lecture capture restricts their teaching practice

Lecturers may need to change the way they teach

Re-usability – what are the implications?

What is it needed for?

What is a good learning package?

How can lecture capture be used to increase student engagement?

Do students become over-dependent on video?

Does lecture capture encourage students to become passive learners?

What is the purpose of lectures?

· Institutional issues

Coordination across different departments

Scalability of Echo 360. Alternatives such as Matterhorn might need to be considered

Scepticism and resistance from lecturers

Suspicion from lecturers that lecturer capture might lead to cuts in staffing

Suspicion from the Students Union executive about the motives for using lecture capture

Are there opportunities for the University to generate income?

Will lecture capture influence competitive advantage?

What are the costs versus benefits?

What are the legal/IPR implications? Who owns the materials?

What are the policy issues?

The Lecture Capture Support site

The ELTAC Team demonstrated the Lecture Capture Support site http://cuba.coventry.ac.uk/lecturecapture/ which is being developed as part of their benefits realisation project. This site is undergoing a ‘repackaging’ process, which will feature a visual redesign and the addition of further content over the next few months. Currently it includes support materials and also examples of electronic lecture capture from external institutions, many present at the assembly.


Developing Guidance Materials

During the afternoon small groups started to outline guidance materials and case studies addressing the issues raised in the morning aimed at supporting practitioners and institutional managers to implement electronic lecture capture within their institutions. The drafts were to be written up by the project team as the basis for guidance material with contributions and acknowledgements from those present.

Future collaboration and community building

The ELTAC team is keen to continue collaborating with interested institutions and to expand this network and seek further mechanisms for sharing of expertise and information. Three possible avenues to explore in relation to seeking support in this are:

JISC Procureweb – http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/services/jiscprocureweb.aspx

JISC InfoNet – http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/

HEA Special Interest Groups – http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/

Conclusion

The Assembly was an enjoyable, productive and successful event which provided participants with plenty of opportunity for discussion and sharing of practice. It was clear that lecture capture is of interest to an increasing number of institutions and that collaborative work and the creation of a community will support further development. Future ELTAC Benefits Realisation project activities will also help to support interested institutions.

With thanks to Juliet Hinrichsen, Amanda Hardy and the ELTAC team for organising and hosting this Assembly.

Jenny Mackness (JISC SSRB Support)

Higher education lifelong learning opportunities (HELLO) Assembly

Aim of the Assembly

The aim was to focus on the success and not so successful techniques of engaging employers in project activity and participation with project outputs.

The intended outcomes where:

· To have an understanding of how other projects have engaged with employers

· To share ideas of how to effectively engage with employers

· To produce a “best practice” list of methods to share with the wider community

Participants

The Assembly was attended by

- Paul Bailey, JISC/Support Project

- Paul Chapman, Leicester College, Libraries and E-Strategy

- Kirsty Coolin – SAMSON Project, University of Nottingham

- Ruth Drysdale – JISC Programme Manager

- Martin Fisk – Assistant Principle for HE, Leicester College

- Lisa Gray – JISC Programme Manager

- Richard Jones, SMART Project, Buckingham New University

- Ian Lindsey – Consultant, Critical Friend for HELLO Project, worked for HEA

- Anita Pinkerden, Associate Director (Public Sector) foundation Degrees Forward

- Magdelena SlowenskaiWoble Project, University of Westminster

- Richard Staniforth – UWIC

- Lucy Stone, HELLO Project Manager, Leicester College

- Dan Vaughan, Information Learning Technologist, Leicester College

- Stuart Wood – SAMSON Project, University of Nottingham

Future Events

Lisa Gray is organising an event on flexible provision in response to employers needs on the 27 May in Birmingham. Further details available from

Presentations

Hello Project – Lucy Stone

Lucy presented an overview of the Moodle sites developed to support foundation degree students within the college.  The HE NET project is working with Dr Sarah Younie from DeMontford University (DMU) to support students progressing to the 3rd year . Of the 600+ learners who went to HE intuitions last year, 61% went to DMU.

HENet is using Mahara to support student led activity. Students are familiar with the social networking aspects of the tool. Mentors from DMU meet with students and then support later through Mahara.

The project is also exploring trying to link tutors with business contacts using Mahara, allowing employers to advertise work placements.

Business development managers in the college have little involvement with HE courses, beyond the validation stage.

SAMSON Project – Kirstie Coolin/Stuart Wood

The University of Nottingham is working with Nottingham Trent University to develop two applications to support employer engagement. They are looking at supporting undergraduate placements and post graduate internships.

The first application allows students to match their skills with employers’ offers of placement students.  This system could use the XCRI standard to allow sharing of placement information across institutions.

The second is being developed with a project with the University of Derby and the Scott Wilson Company, who are running a pilot with engineering students, funded by the company. Scott Wilson Company want weekly updates to monitor employees learning progress and also to be aware when they have a lot of course work or assignments to deliver. The applications links in several information streams (CRM, e-Portfolio, etc) and presents this in a single coordinated interface to the employer.

Foundations Degree Forward – Anita Pickerden

www.fdf.ac.uk

fDf was set up to support developing FDs, and has achiebed its target of 100,000 learners by 2010.

Anita highlighted some common barriers to employer engagement

- Employers don’t understand the language in education.

- Employers have to meet several people from a college/university to get agreement.

- Universities not as responsive as raining providers

- DPA not understood – sharing of information on employees achievement.  Employer paying for course then they have rights but need to ensure student learning contracts and policy.

The fDf employer and partnership relationship publication provides a very detailed overview of hwo to develop successful partnerships with employers. we should check  not duplicating info that has already been produced by fDf see http://www.fdf.ac.uk/page.aspx?id=19

CULN  (Colleges of Leicester Network) produce a Do’s and Don’ts of partnerships see http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/lifelong-learning/culn

It takes a large amount of networking to engage employers, building relationships for 1-2 years before getting started with courses. Relationships need to be maintained overtime keeping the employers in the loop and developing the course together.

Institutional processes need to change to adapt to the needs of employers.

Magdalena Slowinska iWoBLe – Interactive Work Based Learning

The iWoble project is supporting students during placements providing a space for learning, communication and management. They are piloting support for 50 placements students, working with tutors, students and employers. Magdalena has been supporting and evaluating the process within the institution. The findings are suggesting they need to communicate the purpose more clearly to all involved and adopt a more user friendly platform for delivery.

Discussion

The discussion explored the role of BDMs in Colleges who protective of business contacts and reluctant to share with HE curriculum areas. So although colleges have good contacts with employers and processes in place to manage these relationships, it has not always been transferred to the HE curriculum areas.

There is a need to define the process and how to manage the relationship for HE courses within the college and to engage the existing BDMs and existing systems.

Employers are involved in the curriculum design process and validation. They are also frequently used as experts in courses. However practice is inconsistent and fDf are working on quality with providers (is same happening with QAA?)

Discussion around student placements highlighted the need to provide support to business who offer placements. UWIC for example have 200 placements (rising to 500 soon) , defined processes and technology can be used to offer and effective support service. Need to offer incentives for employers to offer placement, they need to see the benefits of getting involved. Also need to sell the benefits of placements to students, valuable experience, supported by reflection for future CV.

There are several reasons why institutions will engage with employer e.g. placements, keeping the curriculum relevant, input to courses, enhance employability, skills development, etc. Any guidance needs to be targeted appropriately. Employers may be offering placements at many levels, school, college and university.

Is there anything (research) from BCE programme that can be shared?

Is BCE a route for supporting BR activities around employer engagement issues?

Time, lunch and a power cut reduced time for discussion and the HELLO project team agreed to produce a wiki with areas for further discussion and to look at developing some guidance materials  on employer engagement.

Further information

The Assembly programme, further details of the presenters and copies of their presentations are available from http://hello.lec.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=10 or contact Lucy Stone lstone@lec.ac.uk .

ELTAC Assembly

Enhancing Lectures through Automated Capture (ELTAC) Assembly

University of Coventry (18-03-2010)

Aims of the Assembly

  • To explore the question of what staff development needs arise when a new capture technology is being introduced into an institution
  • To produce relevant collective resources for use by the wider HE community based on common and divergent experiences in implementing capture technologies for learning and teaching
  • To pool expertise and surface/identify related issues

Participants

The Assembly was attended by:

  • Paul Bailey (JISC)
  • Phil Bradley (Newcastle University)
  • John Couperthwaite (University of Birmingham)
  • John Davies (University of Sussex)
  • Amanda Hardy (Coventry University)
  • Juliet Hinrichsen (Coventry University)
  • Jenny Mackness (JISC)
  • Gameel Nasser (University of Birmingham)
  • Kris Roger (London School of Economics and Political Science)
  • Charles Shields (Loughborough University)
  • Carol Summerside (Newcastle University)

Findings from the ELTAC project

David Morris welcomed participants and briefly outlined the key findings from the ELTAC project

  1. The ‘automated’ bit of lecture capture is difficult. Colleagues won’t necessarily take it on board.
  2. The meaning of ‘lecture’ is very broad.
  3. The conception of what is ‘captured’ has changed for the ELTAC team.
  4. The licence costs of proprietary lecture capture software can be a barrier to scalability
  5. There are organisational barriers – many ‘bits’ of the University needs to be involved to install the technology into lecture theatres, but liaison between them can be difficult.
  6. Lecture capture is less about embedding, automating and technology and more about how lecture capture should be used in the broader framework of teaching and whether it makes a significant difference to teaching and learning.

Programme for the day

The Assembly was planned as a workshop-style day focussing on purposeful community building and the production of a scoping document, management briefing and scenarios to draw out key teaching and learning, infrastructure and managerial issues for use in staff development.  The outputs from the day will be attributed to authors and their institutions and also be available for wider dissemination across the HE sector.

Lecture Capture – key issues

The outputs from the day were informed by initial discussion and sharing of context and issues at individual institutions, which in turn informed the production of a scoping document, management briefing and scenarios. These issues included the following:

  • Practical issues

Technical - such as server problems when scaling up, bugs in the system, people unplugging wires

Room bookings - Some institutions match rooms to student numbers, which makes lecture capture impossible for some groups; Room booking needs to be automated to reduce administration time; Bookings need to be scheduled

Audio – Quality issues; Use of microphones in small venues; Ensuring microphones are switched on

Video – Is it always needed?

Support – How will this be provided?

  • Pedagogical issues

Some lecturers feel that lecture capture restricts their teaching practice

Lecturers may need to change the way they teach

Re-usability – what are the implications?

What is it needed for?

What is a good learning package?

How can lecture capture be used to increase student engagement?

Do students become over-dependent on video?

Does lecture capture encourage students to become passive learners?

What is the purpose of lectures?

  • Institutional issues

 Coordination across different departments

Scalability of Echo 360. Alternatives such as Matterhorn might need to be considered

Scepticism and resistance from lecturers

Suspicion from lecturers that lecturer capture might lead to cuts in staffing

Suspicion from the Students Union executive about the motives for using lecture capture

Are there opportunities for the University to generate income?

Will lecture capture influence competitive advantage?

What are the costs versus benefits?

What are the legal/IPR implications? Who owns the materials?

What are the policy issues?

The Lecture Capture Support site

The ELTAC Team demonstrated the Lecture Capture Support site http://cuba.coventry.ac.uk/lecturecapture/ which is being developed as part of their benefits realisation project. This site is undergoing a ‘repackaging’ process, which will feature a visual redesign and the addition of further content over the next few months.  Currently it includes support materials and also examples of electronic lecture capture from external institutions, many present at the assembly.

Developing Guidance Materials

During the afternoon small groups started to outline guidance materials and case studies addressing the issues raised in the morning aimed at supporting practitioners and institutional managers to implement electronic lecture capture within their institutions. The drafts were to be written up by the project team as the basis for guidance material with contributions and acknowledgements from those present.

Future collaboration and community building

The ELTAC team is keen to continue collaborating with interested institutions and to expand this network and seek further mechanisms for sharing of expertise and information. Three possible avenues to explore in relation to seeking support in this are:

Conclusion

The Assembly was an enjoyable, productive and successful event which provided participants with plenty of opportunity for discussion and sharing of practice. It was clear that lecture capture is of interest to an increasing number of institutions and that collaborative work and the creation of a community will support further development. Future ELTAC Benefits Realisation project activities will also help to support interested institutions.

With thanks to Juliet Hinrichsen, Amanda Hardy and the ELTAC team for organising and hosting this Assembly.

Jenny Mackness (JISC SSRB Support)

Assembly report from TELSTAR (UCLAN)

Attached is the Assembly Report from TELSTAR (UCLAN) from their assembly on APEL/PebblePad held on 1 February 2010.

Employer Engagement Assembly – 24 March 2010 HELLO

Leicester College
Granby Suite
Freemen’s Park Campus
Aylestone Road
Leicester
LE2 7LW
Wednesday 24th March 2010

Aim:
To focus on the success and not so successful techniques of engaging employers in project activity and participation with project outputs.
Outcomes:
To have an understanding of how other projects have engaged with employers.

To share ideas of how to effectively engage with employers.

To produce a “best practice” list of methods to share with the wider community.
Contact: Lucy Stone
Project Manager

 Room 0.06b, Freemen’s Park Campus
Aylestone Road
Leicester
LE2 7LW
 0116 2242000 extension 2555
0796 632 4612
 0116 224 2190
Skype lucyrstone
 lstone@lec.ac.uk

http://hello.lec.ac.uk

i-Borrow Assembly

Learning Spaces and Technology: the iBorrow project

Date: Thursday 25th March 2010

Time: 11.00am – 4.30pm

Location: Canterbury Christ Church University,
Augustine House, Rhodaus Town, Canterbury, Kent, CT1 2YA

Description: The conference will look at the lessons learned and insights gained from the iBorrow Project. This partly JISC-funded project provides 200 thin-client netbook devices within the new library and student services centre, available “as easily as picking a book from a shelf”.

Desktop virtualisation deployed across a wireless network within the large-scale learning space now provides rich management data supporting an enhanced understanding of how students, academic and support staff are reacting to the way that the new resources have been configured.

Who should attend?

The conference will be of interest to anyone involved in planning new libraries, learning centres or learning spaces: senior managers, computing staff, library and information specialists. It will also be of interest to academics and other professionals working in learning, information and communications technologies, e.g. student services managers, educational developers, and learning technologists.

For more information and to book a place go to http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/projects/iborrow/conference-2010.asp

TWOLER Assembly

Unfortunately this event has now had to be cancelled (15-3-10).

Unfortunately, due to staff illness and lack of interest in the assembly, the TWOLER project is cancelling their event on 26 March at the University of Westminster. If you would like more information about the project, please contact Iqbal Hussain I.Hussain8@westminster.ac.uk and visit the project website here https://sites.google.com/a/staff.westminster.ac.uk/twoler/

You are cordially invited to attend an open workshop on User Generated Contributions in Higher Education. The workshop is focused around the themes of Westminster’s recent JISC funded project TWOLER – studying student generated Web 2.0 content with Lightweight Enterprise RSS.

Invitations to this event will also be extended beyond the academic community to selected thought leaders in the emerging world of Socially Generated Content and Web 2.0 in its broadest of definitions.

For full details of the day and sign-up, just click here.

Date: Friday 26th March 2010
Location:
University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW
Learning Futures Room (
link to map)

Timings:

09:30 – 10:00 Arrival (Coffee/Tea, setup)
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome & Introductions
10:10 – 11:40 Session: How easy is that! – Web 2.0 possibilities
11:40 – 12:45 Session: What sort of things will students want to do? – Student potential
12:45 – 13:30 Lunch
13:30 – 15:00 Session: The engagement agenda – Recruitment & contribution
15:00 – 16:00 Session: Resistance is futile – Organisational response

If you have any question or require further assistence, you can contact The TWOLER project manager Iqbal Hussain on +44 (0)207 911 5000 x5413

EASiHE Assembly

Higher learning skills and good feedback

Thank you to the EASiHE team for organising a very interesting, informative and enjoyable workshop on Wednesday 10th February.

The workshop was attended by colleagues from Southampton University, including Trevor Bryant from the e-Assignment project, Robin Drinkwater from the ASSET project, University of Reading, and Roy Williams from the University of Portsmouth.

The purpose of the workshop was to discuss and agree good practice for creating formative assessments for higher order learning skills that give outstanding, computer generated feedback.

Before lunch there were three presentations from:

Lester Gilbert – Theoretical underpinnings

Bill Warburton – Assessing higher order skills

Veronica Gale – Practical aspects of formative assessment of higher order skills

All three presentations prompted stimulating questions and discussion.

After lunch we participated in group work, led by Veronica Gale, in which we were asked to critically evaluate some example e-assessment questions and suggest principles for good practice. This was a very worthwhile activity, which generated a lot of discussion and allowed plenty of time for exchange of ideas and thinking.

The workshop ended with a presentation from David Bacigalupo, about assessing large numbers of students (up to 300) at Warwick and Edinburgh Universities, and providing feedback within one day. As David pointed out, time for assessment is an issue for tutors, particularly in research led universities.

EASiHE will be producing a publication on good practice in formative e-assessment to which the outcomes of this assembly will contribute.

Jenny Mackness

ASSET

The ASSET Project Assembly was held on 14th January 2010 at the University of Reading. Throughout the day there were a number of presentations from JISC Institutional Innovation Projects (Strand 07/8) alongside a number of talks from colleagues based at other HEIs who are exploring the use of video, audio and other e-resources for enhancing staff and student engagement with feedback.

The day ended with an open discussion looking at the pros and cons of using these technologies for feedback provision and included an exploration of the challenges faced when adopting new technologies at an institutional level; colleagues agreed that there was a need for institutions to maintain their desire for innovation, which was felt to be particularly important in the current financial climate.

The ASSET team are now looking to the future and are hoping to work closely with existing networks to support innovations in feedback provision. Further details of the Project Assembly, including downloadable copies of the presentations, are now available on the ASSET website http://www.reading.ac.uk/asset/Dissemination/asset-ProjectAssembly.aspx

Academic Networking assembly: User Testing & Personas

The JISC Academic Networking Project will be holding their Assembly on
User testing and personas on Friday, March 5th in CARET, Cambridge

Here’s a brief timetable of the day

10.30:
- reception, introductions etc

11.00-16.00:
(break for lunch at 12.15)
- personas
- user testing (exercises, best practice)
- questions, discussion

16.00:
We’ll have an optional activity (attendees will be informed by Friday, 19th Feb)

If you’d like to sign up, or find out more about the Assembly please

email katy@caret.cam.ac.uk, or call 01223 765357